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Adapted Classics Blog

Mark Twain Archives | Page 2 of 2 | Adapted ClassicsBlog Posts

News – Eve & Adam Free for Nothin’

My warehouse has been shipping out copies of “Mark Twain’s The Diaries of Eve & Adam“ free for nothin’, but  does that make the news? No – not exactly. Not unless you consider this blog ‘news’. News or not, my warehouse certainly does ship out free for nothin’ new books that we donate to literacy organizations like Reader to Reader and Kids Need to Read. In the past few weeks, 60 library-bound copies of “Mark Twain’s The Diaries of Eve & Adam” went out to each of these two organizations. Both of them provide new and gently-used books to under-resourced public[…] Read More

Banned Books – Mark Twain, Meet Harper Lee

Some public administrators meet and decide that certain books by certain authors like Mark Twain and Harper Lee should be banned because they make readers uncomfortable. Oh, my! Uncomfortable! I’m quite sure that when Harper Lee wrote her celebrated “To Kill a Mockingbird”, she had ‘uncomfortable’ exactly in mind. Since it examined southern culture and questioned its morals, she must have known her book would make some, likely many readers squirm in their skin. Furthermore, she must have hoped such readers would bear their discomfort until the end of the book, then shift whatever perceptions and attitudes had caused their[…] Read More

Fans of Adam Redux – Reconsidering Eve

Fans of Adam might want us to reconsider Eve and apologize for our insults and the violent trip we suggested they take over a waterfall. In anticipation of their desires, we will. Apologies first. Eve was concerned for reckless Adam’s safety. She pressured him to stop going over a waterfall. Like Eve, we are non-violent. So we retract our suggestion that Fans of Adam go over a waterfall in a barrel like Adam did. As far as we are concerned, jumping in a lake is usually safe, so we will stick with that suggestion. Go jump in the lake. As for[…] Read More

Midwest Book Review Recommends “Eve and Adam”

Midwest Book Review recommends “Mark Twain’s The Diaries of Eve and Adam”. You will find their review posted on the Literary Shelf in the October 2017 edition of their e-magazine. It is the first comment we have heard about our newly published book for middle-school readers. Thankfully, it’s a positive one. And we are thankful exactly six times over that Midwest Book Review likes all the books in our Adapted Classics collection of timeless stories for middle-school readers. That someone finally commented on the book pleases us. However, the reviewer disappointed us by quoting Adam’s downer observation about death as the[…] Read More

Fans of Adam – Mark Twain’s The Diaries of Eve and Adam

Fans of Adam might dislike ArtWrite Productions, the publisher of the Adapted Classics book, “Mark Twain’s the Diaries of Eve and Adam”. The reason? The publisher decided to place Eve’s name before Adam’s in the title of the book. This upsets tradition, fans of Adam might say, and you do not upset tradition to appease women or to appeal to them for financial gain (women do buy more books than men, and men almost never buy books for their children). Well, fans of Adam, do you want to know what lake you can jump into? How about the first lake[…] Read More

Adapting Eve & Adam – Intentions and Principles

Issues regarding intentions and principles loomed while adapting “Mark Twain’s The Diaries of Eve and Adam”. I was concerned that Eve’s character could change if I added new material to combine two separate stories by Twain. But I gave myself leeway to add material because I had no intention to change Eve’s character. Heck, I would not intentionally change any aspect of any character created by Mark Twain. My sole motive in adding new material was to keep dialogue going between Eve and Adam from beginning to end. I tried to keep Eve’s character in line with Twain’s Eve by closely considering[…] Read More

Mark Twain’s Goal – Bringing Eve & Adam Together

Mark Twain wanted to bring Eve and Adam together, but his goal went unrealized until after his death. Twain wanted to unite his “creation stories” so Eve and Adam’s different perspectives on creation would stand in high contrast. As Twain said, “They score points against each other — so, if not bound together, some of the points would not be perceived.” In 1931, 21 years after Mark Twain died, Harper finally brought the stories together by publishing a book titled “The Private Life of Adam and Eve”. Mark Twain was a writer at ease with organizing and presenting his ideas. He[…] Read More